Thursday, 4 February 2016

The end of an ear...

In the words of Neil from The Young Ones "I don't wanna bring you down, guys, but..."

As pop music becomes more and more easily accessible and by extension worthless and disposable, not to mention ever more homogenised, truly challenging popular music, as epitomised by David Bowie will become increasingly marginal until, for all practical purposes, it disappears completely. Pop will indeed eat itself. Those of us born between the early 1940s and the early 1960s, or the Baby Boomer generation as it is known, have been lucky to have become teenagers at varying points between the mid 1950s and the 1970s when pop culture, its music and everything that went with it formed the most important part of our leisure time.

When our Baby Boomer generation that provided the bands and their audiences die off, as it will at an alarming rate over the coming couple of decades, the era of music as the main driver for popular culture, mainstream or otherwise will fade away with us, and the signs are already here. Whatever comes after us in popular music can never have the same impact and sense of wonder and exploration. There will never be another artist who can release something as out there and uncompromising as Bowie's Berlin trilogy, for example, yet still manage to shift hundreds of thousands of units of that same wonderful noise. 




Real progressive music will continue on the margins, but as a hobby for its participants, as no-one can now make a living from non-mainstream music. The current economic model of popular streaming sites will force out all but the already large-scale acts. Yes, pop will indeed eat itself...

Tied into this, the gig circuit over the last 10 years or so has shrunk dramatically, with only the larger urban centres able to sustain venues. If like me you are lucky enough to live within a reasonable distance of the capital, then there are still a fair few options gig-wise. However more recently the gentrification of London in particular, although I guess this no doubt applies to other UK cities as well, has seen the closure of small and mid-sized venues continue apace, driven by ludicrous property prices lighting up £ signs in venue owners' eyes as they envisage turning your local sound emporium into chicken coop apartments for the self-satisfied and smug who will then complain endlessly in their loud whiny voices at the very idea of hordes of plebs enjoying themselves in their vicinity, should there still remain a nearby fleapit or two.

Pop has now eaten itself and belched copiously, and by doing so has allowed bland corporatism to take over the means of production, distribution and consumption. I can only hope it gets severe indigestion. Perhaps we need a 21st century version of the punk rock revolution to tear it all down? The problem is the yoof of today are either too subsumed by enforced educational debt and worry, or are living a life on breadline wages in prospect-free employment to have the leisure time to care. As for the cowed general populace, addicted to their computer games and mind-numbing shite TV, their opinions moulded by a media with an increasingly right-wing agenda, they have been turned fat and lazy by convenience foods and couldn't give a shit...which they are incapable of anyway, as all that McD can only make you constipated.

Now, where's that bottle of JD, barman? Wotcha mean, I drank it already?...

This has been your Warr Correspondent Roger McNasty, 56 and counting...

Saturday, 23 January 2016

The Fall - Last Night At The Palais

Is there anyone in the world who owns every Fall album? I somehow doubt it. If there is, they probably need a shrink. I've got 307 of the buggers bowing out a shelf, but there are at least another 158 I have never heard, and that's just fine. The Fall are a band, nay an institution (madhouse?) one can dip into and out of at will. They seem to have always been there, and they will only stop when Mark E. Smith slumps over his last pint, never to curmudge again.

There is no reason to buy this 2009 released album for the soundtrack alone, unless you were there. No, the real strange attraction of this set is the DVD, documenting the last ever gig at that famous old venue the Hammersmith Palais, on April 1st, 2007. The last crowd of white men (and a few women) in "'ammer-palay", as Joe once immortalised it were to be moved on, they don't want your type here no more, make way for the never-ending encroachment (Yarbles!) of gentrification.

"Northern white crap that talks back"

Mark E. Smith, national treasure and icon of angry middle aged working class blokes up and down the land sat alone in dreary sink estate pubs nursing their 12th pint of cheap weak lager, not that they would know who he is anyway, leaves it four minutes after his band have started before he shambles on to the stage at the soon to be defunct Hammersmith Palais, located in "your so-called capital-ah". During this time the band belt out the mantra "Senior twilight stock replacer" over and over with manic enthusiasm to a furious backing, no doubt brought on by paranoia at the prospect of being intimdated at worst, or having their amp settings buggered up by their curmudgeonly old soak of a boss at best. They can't get away with owt, as Smith's wife is there with them as they thunder along...who knows, does she spy? Paranoia in cheap shit room, indeedy.

"Fall Sound - no laptop wankers overground"


Fall Sound has maintained its shambolic origins, and now covers up musical deficiencies with a sledgehammer relentless beat. Musically, the star of this show, the last in this famous old venue before it was no doubt turned into a block of apartments priced way out of reach of normal Londoners, is the twin-bass attack of Rob Barbato and Dave Spurr, whose churning rumble threatens to make the waiting wrecking crew redundant before the gentrification rebuild has even started. Determinedly amateur, Mrs Smith aka Elena Poulou's childlike keyboard playing slaps a layer of strangely sinister naivety over proceedings, recalling Yvonne Pawlett on that very first album, released almost 38 years ago. There are no laptops in evidence, natch.

"Repetition in the music, and we're never gonna lose it"

Repetition is at the centre of The Fall's sonic template, taking its cues from classic Krautrock. Klaus Dinger sounds comparatively subtle in comparison, for here the motorik rhythms are flattened out by jackhammers. The pace is even, but relentless, building up to a crescendo with the superbly and dangerously hypnotic Blindness.

"Check the record, check the guy's track record"

A vast number of albums have spilled their invective over a pavement (heheh) near you since 1979's Live At The Witch Trials, but MES is notoriously wary of nostalgia, so checking out his track record in a live environment is a definite no-no. Of the 12 numbers on this album, five come from the then latest album Reformation Post TLC, and of the rest, only Wrong Place, Right Time can be claimed to be an oldie in any true sense of the word, coming from 1988's I Am Kurious Oranj - my favourite Fall album, for what it's worth.

"How dare you assume I wanna parlez-vous with you"

It's OK Mark, I have no desire to meet you, as you are certainly of the "hero not to be met" subset. I'll bet your taste in beer is quite poor, too.




With his twisted verbosity, MES can make what at first listen might even be a love song - heaven forfend - turn into something quite nasty. "My door is always open to you" slurs Smith incessantly on My Door Is Never but beware, for "...my spectre is coming after you, I crave your death within my mind's eye".

"Eccentric lad, 
He keeps flawless, plastic women's bosoms under his TV desk and dressing room"

Stranger than MES is is his wife's monotone East European intonation of the above line and other bizarre cut up lyrics contained within a charging version of The Wright Stuff, which like everything else here pummels the studio version into submission.

The band veer between being tight as a nut to the point where the whole thing nearly collapses during a shambolic take on rockabilly standard White Lightning, with one of the guitars being woefully out of tune, but hey, that's all part of their charm. Prog rock this ain't! That was the more conventional of the two covers in the set, a thing for which MES has a keen ear. The other is Zappa's Mother's tune Hungry Freaks, Daddy...no, really!

As legend has it the previous version of this band were goaded by MES into mass resigantion after an incident on a tour bus where our Chief Grouch allegedly poured a full pint of beer over their coach driver's head while said busman was piling along a freeway at 70mph. That 208th line up of the band left us with an album appropriately titled Fall Heads Roll, incidentally the last Fall album I bought. Contained therein is a  Fall anthem to rank up there with the finest, and here it is in all its nine-minutes of Krautrock via Salford-unter-blitzkreig glory...



Bearded bass player Rob Barbato, who for most the gig seems to be glancing nervously at his Glorious Leader, perhaps expecting some kind of censure for being ill-advisedly facially hirsute-ah, finally relaxes and beams like a kid when Smith gets playful and almost ruffles his beard during this final number. Smith later gives his microphone to the crowd, who ironically enough, rant into it unintelligibly, while the Glorious Leader messes about with his wife's synth. What a glorious racket this Northern misanthrope and his charges make. I can quite understand if you hate it, and so could MES. We wouldn't have it any other way!

So, it seems The Hammersmith Palais fell to gentrification-uh, as blindness takes over the nation-uh...I, plagiarist-ah. Thangyew and gudnite...

Tracklist:
1. Senior Twilight Stock Replacer
2. Pacifying Joint
3. Fall Sound
4. Over! Over!
5. Theme From Sparta FC
6. Hungry Freaks, Daddy
7. Wrong Place, Right Time
8. My Door Is Never
9. The Wright Stuff
10. White Lightning
11. Blindness
12. Reformation (encore)


Line up:
Mr & Mrs Smith, and some other blokes, some of whom you may know personally. After all there is now only three degrees of separation between The Fall and everyone in the UK. Four, if you live elsewhere!

Links:
Official website

Fansite - with all the lyrics - you don't imagine I can actually understand what MES is mithering about, do you?

Thursday, 21 January 2016

David Bowie - Blackstar, White Noise

Perhaps it helps not being a fan per sé, but the feeling of loss since waking to the awful news on that fateful Monday morning of 11th January 2016 still lingers, if tempered by subsequently overdosing on the better parts of David Bowie's back catalogue. Bowie's large but not excessive musical back pages have now become his legacy. Let it not be forgotten that he was also an actor, and he influenced fashion, theatre, video, and changed rigid gender perceptions, even I suspect amongst the most macho of builders' labourers, I mean, just look at The Spiders! However there can be no question that what Bowie will be chiefly remembered for is his massive contribution to popular music.

The first Bowie album I bought new was Low, as prior to that, although aware of the singles via Top of the Pops and later my secondhand copy of Changesonebowie, I was a rock fan, and rock fans didn't buy singles, they bought albums, there was a strong demarcation and ne'er the twain shall meet. It seems odd now, but for that reason it never occurred to me at the time that Bowie was an album artist as much as if not more than he was a pop star who lived off his 45s. It didn't take me long to work up the hill backwards from that groundbreaking opening salvo of what became known as the Berlin trilogy, and by the time I saw him live for the one and only time at a baking hot Milton Keynes Bowl on 3rd July 1983 on the Let's Dance tour I was as familiar with his music as most of that seething, happy, and sunburned mass of people. Looking at the setlist now, it seems he played everything anyone could have wanted. Happy days...

Nobody asked, but here's my own personal perspective on Bowie's musical legacy, with an obviously highly subjective mark out of ten for each album. Nothing too heavy, mainly impressionistic, and I may even nominate my favourite, bloody difficult though that is. This list sticks to Bowie's original studio output, and so excludes Pin Ups and compilations. I have also left out his two soundtracks, as I am unfamiliar with them, and, well, because I can! I would also point out that prior to this exercise I had not heard the first album entitled David Bowie, nor Never Let Me Down or Tin Machine II, and only cursory listens had been given to the first Tin Machine album, and to everything from Black Tie White Noise through to Reality (with the exception of 1.Outside) - see, I told you I wasn't a proper fan! These omissions have now been remedied as far as possible.

So, put your helmet on, jump on, and hang on to yourself...

Here's a handy Spotify playlist with a track from each album, and to make it a tad more interesting, not necessarily the obvious choice, but one that hopefully represents each album's mood...



David Bowie
Release date 1st July 1967
6/10 (first impression)

Here we find Mr Jones chanelling Newley, Barratt, and Ray Davies, and maybe Scott Walker doing Brel. The end result is something of a curio, but quite fun all the same. He pronounces "scones" to rhyme with cone, the bounder!
...

David Bowie
Release date 4th November 1969
6.5/10

And...start again...we'll forget the first one...Bowie's second self-titled album was re-released in 1972 as "Space Oddity", for obvious reasons. That song alone is worth an extra half mark in my ranking, the rest mostly being a two years too late psychedelically tinged singer-songwriter excursion, but enjoyable nonetheless. The occasional instrumental embellishment, skewed lyrics and some fairly complex arrangements hint at what is to come.
...

The Man Who Sold The World
Release date 4th November 1970
5/10

Despite containing the first earful of Mick Ronson and Mick "Woody" Woodmansey, The Man Who Sold The World has not aged well, plodding along for the most part in 70s hard rock style, and it is a bit of a sideways step from the promise shown on the previous record. Highlights are the pastoral shades of After All which give the listener a welcome break from the lumpen and leaden rock music that surrounds it. That, and the title track, simply for the strength of its tune. The Supermen also might have had what it takes but is bogged down by a club-footed arrangement. On this LP you can hear Bowie floundering around looking for but failing to find that certain "something". By far the most daring thing about The Man Who Sold The World was its quickly withdrawn original "dress" cover, which also makes it the most valuable Bowie album for the record collector.
...

Hunky Dory
Release date 17th December 1971
10/10

Given that last record...where the fuck did this come from??! Bowie's muse hadn't so much as landed as moved in with all its belongings and put its feet firmly under the table. It must have been down to Trevor Bolder replacing Tony Visconti on bass! Possibly...

If you don't know this album you are either very young, or you've not been paying attention. Stylistically shifting, surreal and timeless, there are simply so many great songs on this record, if this had been Bowie's only album, rather than being a jumping-off point for the proto-Ziggy, it would still be spoken of in hushed terms of wonder. Or...bleedin' marvellous!
...

The Rise and Fall Of Ziggy Stardust & The Spiders From Mars
Release date 6th June 1972
8/10

Bowie was still very much "ours" when this platter fell to Earth. With hindsight it is bizarre how this album only got to No.5 compared with Hunky Dory's No.3, given that it is now probably Bowie's best known platter, at least on this side of the Pond. Mind you, guess how high it got in the USA? No.75, that's what! Astonishing but true.

Marc Bolan may have invented glam rock, but Bowie knew more than three Chuck Berry chords, and with the backing of the best rock band in Hull, starring a nascent Mick Ronson on shiny new Gibson, took the glam racket to previously unimagined places. You all know that anyway, so I'll stop now.
...

Aladdin Sane
Release date 13th April 1973
9/10

Ziggy's rock'n'roll high jinks on the road in the YouEssAy, and the first of many album appearances on the piano for Mike Garson, whose lyrical runs light up the the sublime title track, Time and Lady Grinning Soul in particular. It was a long time since I last played this record, I'd forgotten how good it is and yes, I prefer it to Ziggy. That gatefold cover is something else, too. Unsurprisingly given what preceded it, this was Bowie's first No.1 album in the UK, and the first album the USA took much notice of, rising to a giddy No.17 on the charts.
...

Diamond Dogs
Release date 24th May 1974
7/10

The first album from Bowie that links the past and the future, an odd mix of big-haired glam rock and soulful excursions, some of it would have formed a soundtrack to an abortive stage production of Orwell's 1984. Not played it in years before writing this piece, and I'm still of the opinion that it does not quite gel. Still a decent album though.
...

Young Americans
Release date 7th March 1975
8/10

Tapping into the current muiscal zeitgeist was now what was expected of Bowie, and coupled with his love of Motown, Young Americans was the natural result. It's been called "fake soul", "a pastiche", "plastic soul", and worse by its detractors, but as ever our man has moulded the influence into something indelibly Bowie. Full of soulful tearjerkers and effortless funk, Young Americans is a gem. I used to have the album on pre-recorded cassette, I only bought it because Bowie's cover of Across The Universe was the soundtrack to what I naively thought was the discovery of "love" at a school disco...simpler times, although it didn't feel that way back then.
... 

Station To Station
Release date 23rd January 1976
7.5/10

"It's not the side effects of cocaine...it's too late...the European cannon is here" sang Bowie on the urgently paced, sprawling title track to his latest album, a song and an album that again bridged his past to his future. Ill advised Nazi salutes, TV chat show appearances coked out of his mind, the game was as good as up. Recognising that unless he escaped the drug-crazed surreal world of hangers on that was L.A,, it would be the death of him, dropping that line into the song was a statement of future intent. Station To Station the track and TVC 15 point at what is coming, while the rest of this fine LP carries on mining the rich seam of white soul in some style.
...

Low
Release date 14th January 1977
10/10

Another "Whoa!" moment, and a bold step into the unknown for Bowie, both geographically and sonically. Relocating to Berlin with Iggy Pop, both with detox on their minds, Bowie teamed up with Brian Eno whose unconventional methods helped The Thin White Duke clean up, put on some weight and become merely slightly underweight, and produce one side of very left-field pop, and another of Krautrock influenced ambient instrumental music that must have lost him more fans than it gained.  Low was the first Bowie album I bought new, and with few preconceptions. I thought then it was wonderful and still do.
...

"Heroes"
Release date 14th October 1977
9.5/10

You know you're a national treasure when Team GB walks out to your best known tune at our home Olympics. The old dame must have been proud! "Heroes" the song is a bona-fide all time classic and will probably last longer than any other Bowie song. Old Bobby Fripp had a big part in making it sound like it did with his unique style rattling the speakers. The only reason this record does not score 10 is that it was basically Low part two, and although a more sophisticated record, it didn't quite have the jaw-dropping impact, on me at any rate. My, my...
...

Lodger
Release date 18th May 1979
8/10

The last of the Berlin trilogy, although perhaps a better name would have been be the Eno trilogy, as this album has little physical connection to the erstwhile German capital as far as I can tell, being recorded in Switzerland and the USA during tour breaks, although the songs may well have been at least partly penned in Berlin. Pop creeps back in to the Eurocentric experimentation as the Bowie-Eno partnership comes to an end. A planned instrumental second side along the lines of the previous two LPs was ditched in favour of a more traditional song format throughout, but there are still large helpings of weirdness spread all over this record.
...

Honourable mentions must be made here for Iggy Pop's The Idiot and Lust For Life, both written and recorded during the Berlin period, and Bowie is all over The Idiot in particular. The two LPs contain superior versions of the songs Bowie wrote for or co-wrote with his friend, namely China Girl, Sister Midnight (which with a new set of cut up lyrics became Red Money on Lodger), and Tonight, as well as maintaining the dislocated and slightly sinister airs of the Berlin trilogy.
...

Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps)
Release date 12th September 1980
10/10

If I were allowed only one Bowie album as I floated away in my tin can, this would be it. The album where experimentation and pop perfection get it on for forty or so minutes of musical eargasm. Utterly, utterly brilliant. If you disagree you are very, very wrong. :)
...

Let's Dance
Release date 14th April 1983
8/10

The album that made Bowie the biggest music star in the world for a few years, culminating in his triumphant appearance at Live Aid. Teaming up with Nile Rodgers was only going to result in a marvellous dance-pop album, and that is exactly what happened. I defy even the most morose goth not tap his or her feet to the title track. Marvellous stuff!
...

Tonight
Release date 1st September 1984
5/10

Not as bad as I remember it, possibly because I've now listened to Never Let Me Down, next to which any old average Bowie fare is going to shine like a polished gemstone. Mind you, four of the songs on here are cover versions, which more than hints that Bowie was fast running out of steam. Also, the sublime take on the Beach Boys' God Only Knows is by far the best track on here, and that says it all!
... 

Never Let Me Down
Release date 27th April 1987
3/10 (I'm feeling generous) (first and probably final impression - I doubt I'll listen to it again!)

Even a man as talented as David Bowie can be (snow) blinded by international mega-stardom, and if ever there was proof that global domination does nothing for the artist's muse, this clunker of an album is it. From the very first crash of THAT awful 80s drum sound on opener Day In Day Out I just knew that this record was going to be a stinker. I sat through it all...and I was right. God, a lot of pop music in the 1980s was rubbish, was it not?
...

Tin Machine - Tin Machine & Tin Machine II
Release date 22nd May 1989 & 2nd September 1991
6/10 & 6.5/10 (II - first impression)

See that vein throbbing in Bowie's forehead? The Duke is raging and obviously wants to expunge all that bland corporate pop pap he'd been suckered into with an overdose of testosterone fuelled noise rock. Tin Machine were Bowie's first proper group since the late 1960s, as the Spiders were a mere fictional beast, and in any event only (ha!) a backing band.

Powered along by Iggy's sometime rhythm section, the punchy R&B-tight Sales brothers, guitarist Reeves Gabrels screeches and howls over the top of these democratically conceived non-songs, and the end result is a relentless steel-edged hard as nails mix of punky attitude and avant rock. The fans must have hated it. II is slightly more restrained and has a smidgen more melody, and this being the first time I've listened to it I am relieved to find that it is actually better than its harsh reputation.

Ultimately, Tin Machine were a necessary catharsis for Bowie, but something of a flawed experiment. If Bowie was avant anything, he was avant pop, and his innate sense of melody did not sit well with Gabrels' eardrum rattling avant rock dissonance. Move on...
...

From here on in, with the exception of 1.Outside and the last two albums, I'm entering virgin teritory, so these are only mere impressions from one or two listens via Spotify...I know, I know, but it's not like Bowie's estate needs the money, is it?

Black Tie, White Noise
Release date 27th April 1987
7/10 (first impression)

Discounting his final two albums, this was Bowie's last number 1 in the UK, from the days when albums sold in such quantities as to make the achievement a notable event. Re-connecting with Nile Rodgers, Black Tie, White Noise is an album of modern dance music containing some classy tunes and top drawer playing from a stellar cast. A poignant last hook-up with Mick Ronson is on here, as well as some interesting covers, namely Cream's I Feel Free, a version of Scott Walker's Nite Flights that arguably betters the original, and a very tongue-in-cheek I Know It's Gonna Happen Someday, or as Bowie puts it a "totally camp" take on "me singing Morrissey singing me". Marvellous!
...

The Buddah of Suburbia
Release date 8th November 1993
7/10*

My rambling missive initially did not contain an entry for this album, as I mistakenly mistook it for a soundtrack. I have since been admonished and told to go sit on the naughty step by record producer Lee Fletcher, who has this to say about this admittedly rather good album:

"The Buddha Of Suburbia is not a soundtrack album, it's inspired by the music he wrote for the series but is an original Bowie record, and is the stepping stone into 1.Outside territory. It is a key album for him, and one of his personal faves, and the one that reintroduced many of the 'Eno' working methods thus ushering in their 90's collaboration. He also re-recorded Strangers When Me Meet for 1.Outside. It's not perfect, but it's frequently overlooked as many folks assume it's just a soundtrack album"

Indeed they do... *the mark is mine, not Lee's, I hasten to add. Can I come back in from the garden now? I'll catch my death in the fog. ;)
...

1.Outside
Release date 26th September 1995
8/10

Definitely Bowie's prog rock album, centered around a bizarre concept that could be seen as a logical paranoid modern extension of Pete Townshend's abortive Lifehouse project. Mike Garson relates an interesting tale where the band would be recorded improvising for hours on end, with the re-united Bowie and Eno assembling the best parts to form the music for Bowie's lyrics. That may explain why it is a little short on melody, but the album makes up for it with Bowie's most startling experimentalism and "next move" since dropping Low on an unsuspecting world.
...

Earthling
Release date 3rd February 1997
6.5/10 (first impression)

Written and recorded in only 2½ weeks straight after the end of the Outside tour, the urgency and energy in these zeros and ones is apparent from the off, appropriating then current drum'n'bass sounds to clattering effect. When it works, it is fabulous, as The Last Thing You Should Do proves, where a detached Bowie languidly semi-sings "What have you been doing to yourself" while the manic beats fly all around in a haze of wired paranoia. When it fails, as on the preceding Telling Lies, those same itchy scratchy rhythms add nothing to an already menacing song.

This album has returned to the feel of the second and third albums in this list, where Bowie is not reinventing current trends but merely using them.
...

'Hours...'
Release date 4th October 1999
8/10 (first impression)

A deeply reflective and melancholy album of love lost, perceived personal failure and a long-postponed "growing up" via coming to terms with long-suppressed emotions, 'Hours..." has a suitably low-key musical backing, the kind of thing that has to be done right to avoid sounding dreary, and Bowie does it right, natch. One particular rhetorical lyric states "I got seven days to live my life, or seven days to die". The positive choice neatly sums up Bowie's attitude to life. Blimey...I said I wasn't going to get heavy...oh well...

Of the hitherto unheard albums, this is the one I've played the most, and my inital 8/10 seems about right.
...

Heathen
Release date 11th June 2002
7/10 (first impression)

Opening track Sunday is great in a "before he went strange" Scott Walker fashion. Afraid  is a wonderfully edgy paranoid rock song performed as if straining at a leash, love the organ sound on it too. The lyrics on Heathen seem full of angst and  concern, not unsurprising as it was presumably at some point in production when 9/11 happened. A general air of sadness pervades. Sounds like it is worth persevering with.
...

Reality
Release date 16th September 2003
6/10 (first impression)

There are some good things on here; the frantic title track, the lovely, regretful ballad Days, and his cover of Jonathan Richman's Pablo Picasso for instance, but there's nothing on here that particularly makes me want to play it more than the few times I have for the purpose of this now mammoth scribble except maybe the closing stripped-back epic Bring Me The Disco King, which sounds like the kind of song Morrissey has dreams of writing, but loses the thread as soon as he wakes up. Mostly, this album comes over as a bit tired and world-weary, but I suppose if you're going to confront reality and "the devil in the marketplace", then that's kinda inevitable.

While onstage in Germany the following year on the Reality tour Bowie fell ill, and according to which reports you read, was either suffering from an acutely blocked artery and/or had a heart attack. We all thought he had subsequently retired, until...
...

The Next Day
Release date 8th March 2013
8/10

Remember what a marvellous surprise it was when The Next Day's imminent release was announced on Bowie's 66th birthday, followed by the suitably oblique video for Where Are We Now? It certainly lived up to the hype, and thankfully, in my house at least, has not turned out to be one of those "instant" records that gathers dust after a frantic initial first umpteen spins on repeat.

A "thankyou" album, to his fans, with many nods to his back catalogue, and with a sprightly new lease of life running through it, The Next Day is a life-affirming thing, and kicks some serious ass. The sound of a man acknowledging his past while pointing to the future, which as we know, was soon to play the cruellest trick. Possibly the best comeback album by anyone, ever?
...

Blackstar
Release date 8th January 2016

It's still raw, and I can't listen to this with any kind of detached objectivity, and frankly Blackstar is for the time being beyond being cheapened by grading, so no mark given. Ask me in six months. What I can say is that Bowie's parting gift illustrates his keenness to explore right up to the end. Much has been made of his ditching his regular musical collaborators and hooking up with a New York modern jazz group, but this album is definitely not jazz, oh no. Bowie uses the jazz musicians' differing perspectives in a textural manner, lending the album a highly modernistic and impressionistic sheen and a sometimes edgy atmosphere, concomitant with the terminal circumstances of its creation. The first time I heard the opening title track I could have sworn that drum sound was electronically generated, but no, it is actually played by drummer Mark Guiliana. How many rock drummers could have done that?

Mark's rhythms are central to the album, propelling the dryly humorous 'Tis A Pity She Was A Whore with an unerring pulsebeat that links it to motorik rhythms from back in the Low days. His jazz phrasing makes the now almost unbearably poignant Lazarus more edgy than it would otherwise have been in the hands of a straight ahead rock drummer. Sue (Or In A Season Of Crime) pre-dates the rest of the songs, appearing as it did with a full on brass arrangement on the last "Best Of" album. Here it motors along, overlaid with swathes of impressionistic and heavy electronica sound piloted by a funky and spidery (ha!) guitar line. Girl Loves Me seems to have one of those dense cut up Bowie lyrics, this time peppered with pseudo-Nadsat atop a menacing electro-bass line in funereal tempo...scary! Dollar Days, not the already familiar Lazarus was the song that made me well up when I finally steeled myself to listen to the CD some five days (no coincidence intended) after I got home that fateful Monday evening to find it waiting for me on the doormat, having been pre-ordered it some weeks previously. There's always one damn song, eh Dave? I can't analyse Dollar Days here, just go listen for yourself. Nostalgia creeps in by way of a reprised harmonica line from New Career In A New Town on the closing track I Can't Give Everything Away, a heart-tugging full stop of a song with a lovely sax solo from Donny McCaslin, again rhythmically powered to the end where a glorious Fripp-like guitar break accompanies Mark's on the nose drumming.

There are no other remaining and widely popular musicians of Bowie's sadly rapidly depleting generation who would be capable of making a parting gesture as potent and startling as Blackstar, it's that simple. The songs on Blackstar that deal with mortality and impending death form an artistic statement that has few parallels in popular culture, let alone music. For a while at least it is inevitable that the "non-death" songs will be overlooked, but they are an important part of what I've little doubt will be seen to be in years to come as one of Bowie's best albums.

That's all folks...
...

The era of iconic and strange rock stars who touch the lives of ordinary folk who wouldn't normally have anything to do with the unconventional dies with David Bowie, partly because of his unique genius, and partly because the cultural significance of his preferred medium of expression continues to become ever more marginalised, rendered disposable, stripped of any sense of permanence and worth in a digital age of instant gratification, where information overload results in lowered attention spans. Where once, good popular music was art, it is now merely artifice, no matter how good the intentions. There is no love in zeros and ones.

David Bowie was probably the only popular musician of his era who could get away with dropping large helpings of very left-field thinking into an ostensibly "pop" medium and yet remain successful. There will never be another musician who will be able to subvert and drive popular culture on such an unprecedented scale over a sustained period in the manner Mrs Jones' boy did for the duration of the 1970s. Many have said this already, but it's worth repeating: those of you who went through your teenage years in the 60s had Lennon, those of us who came of age in the 70s had Bowie. The former represented the hope and idealism of his age, while the latter reflected the paranoia of the his age back at us, but in a most positive fashion. It was inevitable that Lennon and Bowie would collaborate at some point, fittingly enough on the subject of celebrity.

Thanks for all that wonderful music David, it was a good trip...from Ibiza to the Norfolk Broads, via LA, Berlin, New York, and on out to the Blackstar...

"Everybody knows me now..."

David Bowie 8th January 1947 - 10th January 2016 RIP

Monday, 11 January 2016

David Bowie R.I.P.

It all seems so obvious now...the lyrics...the Lazarus video, in fact most of Blackstar witnesses David Bowie having a chat with Death. As a parting artistic statement it is perhaps without precedent. However, this is not a review of David Bowie's last album, but merely a cathartic outpouring of words about a man, who for those of us who came of age in 1970s was, no REALLY WAS an icon. I was only 10 or 11 when the Beatles broke up, and Bowie was our John Lennon, and in our eyes far more important and relevant, obviously. The word "genius" is another cheapened by overuse, but most assuredly applies in his case.

I'm not about to make grandiose claims that Bowie changed my life. Hell, I was only 12 when Ziggy landed, and the barely aware of anything beyond my small universe, so I wasn't about to start slapping on the eyeliner and dressing up strange. I do remember watching this weird science fiction rockstar on Top Of The Pops, and it tied nicely into my sci-fi reading habits at the time.

I suppose I really got into his music from Low onwards, when I had the cash to spend on LPs, and the Berlin trilogy is as good a place as any to start. It didn't take long before the back catalogue was explored, and although I would never have called myself a fan, I had a fair few of his albums by the time I saw him live for the one and only time, on a baking hot day at Milton Keynes Bowl on July 2nd 1983. This was part of his Serious Moonlight tour on the back of Let's Dance, and the start of his often overlooked commercial pop phase, and true world domination. Maybe not his most artistically worthy period, but Let's Dance was actually a decent album, and with David aided in the studio by Nile Rodgers rather than Tony Visconti it was always going to be poptastic.

The 1980s were a fashion disaster, were they not?

As for the gig itself, to be fair I don't recall that much about it...it was in the 80s, you see... ;)
I do remember I nodded off during the inappropriately named Icehouse's set, and woke up with sunburn, especially on my feet which probably made the rest of the day rather painful...

http://www.ukrockfestivals.com/Milton-Keynes-1983.html

...not that I would have cared, just look at that setlist!

I've been feeling numb all day, and I have not been affected so much by a celebrity death since John Peel's passing but writing this has helped, and I'm not even going to link to it on Farcebook, as it is merely a personal cathartic exercise.

Thanks for the music David, stir those atoms back up!

"This way or no way
You know, I’ll be free
Just like that bluebird
Now ain’t that just like me"


Wednesday, 6 January 2016

Census of Hallucinations - Nothing Is As It Seems

Since reactivating his marvellous troupe of fried agitproppers in 2012 with the rather fine Dragonian Days album, Tim Jones has led his Census of Hallucination troops into a period of high studio activity, resulting in no less than five albums, and a double album career-spanning retrospective to date. Nothing Is As It Seems consists of the quartet of songs that made up 2014's Imagine John Lennon EP, plus five new songs, all linked by a loose theme based around alienation in the modern world, a place that is essentially a prison for our thoughts, a place where freedom for the 1% is a given, but far from reality for the rest of us, many of whom are complicit, having "left their brains at home". Those in power will have us "Emptying the Atlantic with a cup, emptying the Pacific with a spoon", and we'll be bloody grateful, doff yer titfer.

Where was I? Oh yeah...I am well aware how this "woe is me" theme is all too prevalent these days, reflecting the sad times we live in, but in the hands of a skilled wordsmith like Tim the subject becomes far more than the wearily mournful shoe gazing you will find in most other lyrical themes that tread this well-trodden path.

"Dread locks you in" intones Tim in his very 'umble Dickensian semi-spoken tones on the ballroom-friendly title track, just one small example of Mr Jones's way with words. The quite fittingly loopy video below illuminates the abstractions of Elephant, Elephant, Elephant where Tim digs deep into his river of consciousness and comes up smiling with...

If there's a hedgehog in your bus lane,
Don't be worried,
It's just looking for the Mayfly,
There's a feeling I get as I walk down the steps,
That this just might not lead to heaven, 

...and that is just the start of a long trip into Tim's altered state thought processes. You'll get the gist by the end unless you're daft!


He can also rant with the best of them, as the whole spoken lyric to Nautilus shows...here's a little snippet:

Eradicating the addiction to being stuck,
Survival mode through the struggle,
Taking responsibility for our own thoughts,
Become that for which you pray,
Or go back to sleep,
Cognitive dissonance is the enemy

As is only right and proper, all the lyrics to this fine slab of penmanship can be found on the band's website (link down there somewhere).

Musically, Census Of Hallucinations play out a mostly fairly minimalistic but nonetheless full sound, often given a dreamy vibe via Maxine Marten's and Terri B's backing vocals. Proceedings are occasionally enlivened by the flowing acid lead guitar of one John Simms, a name some of you may recognise. Yes, this is the same John Simms who was once the mere 18-year old prodigious guitar wrangler behind the semi-mythical Clear Blue Sky. Their gloriously primal self-titled album from 1970 cries out for a full-treatment reissue...Esoteric Recordings, are you reading?

John Simms'  largely plays with washes of colour, his subtle echo-drenched interjections mostly lurking quite low in the the floating trip of a mix, occasionally bursting out with a liquid flurry of notes, as in evidence towards the end of Faculty Of Mirrors, all quite peachy!

There is a distinct whiff of Gong in these grooves, but where that band, not so much latter-day admittedly, but certainly in earlier incarnations at least were sometimes well away with the faeries, the twinkle-toed winged elfin creatures inhabiting Censusworld wear boots, goddamn, and they are grounded very much in the here and now. The wistful space-ballad He Who Can Manage Camels is full of lyrics starkly reminding us of the place of us mere plebs in the grand scheme of things, and where it could meander off with a sigh and into a hippy reverie in an air laden with thick bong smoke, reality bites back:

It's not Shiva or Buddah or Zoroastra,
That's gonna solve your problems mate,
It's in the here and now,
In the know how,
Of why we're here

I hope my inadequate scribbling has piqued your interest in this album, and the weird and wonderful world of Census of Hallucinations. If you like what you hear, try the career-spanning compilation A Bundle Of Perceptions/A Parliament Of Modules for a very varied and trippy overview of the lifetime of this fine bunch of Kosmische travellers.


Tracklist:
1. Conspiracy Of Silence (5:39)
2. Elephant, Elephant, Elephant (6:37)
3. In Ruins (7:07)
4. Nothing Is As It Seems (5:30)
5. Faculty Of Mirrors (7:05)
6. Nautilus (7:49)
7. 95 to 5 (4:14)
8. He Who Can Manage Camels (9:05)
9. Brainless Ape (4:46)

Total running time - 57:55

Line up:
Tim Jones - Vocals
Kevin Hodge - Electrified acoustic guitar
John Simms - Electric guitar, guitar synth, keyboards & backing vocals, bass on Nautilus
Mark Dunn - Bass & cello
Paddi - Drums & percussion
Terri B - Backing vocals
Maxine Marten - Backing vocals & percussion
James Jones - Narration of his poem Lost In The Lakes
Barry Lamb - Sax, synth & Mellotron on In Ruins 


Links:
Census of Hallucinations website

Sunday, 20 December 2015

2015 - A Year In Review

Another year passes; a year of turmoil and tragedy, where as ever the poor are made to pay for the greed of the 1% in an ideologically driven fatwah in the name of capital. Still, there's always music, eh? Looking at last year's lists, it seems 2015 overall has not quite hit those high standards, but there has still been a veritable small hillock of commendable releases, and here I will scratch at the surface with my annual roundup.

Again for your delight I have put together a Spotify playlist, where the relevant release can be found in that digital Fagin's lair of goodies pilfered from the struggling artist...or summat. There will be other links in the main body for those artists who either eschew or have no truck with the miserly streaming beastie. So, sit back and light a big one, boil some sprouts, chase a reindeer, whatever floats yer bauble, and plow your way through this little lot...





Album titles link to reviews, * = my personal highlights

Julie Tippetts & Martin Archer - Vestigium



Julie Tippetts, long-time jazz songstress, initially famous for her association with Brian Auger in the 1960s, and Martin Archer, a multi-talented independent Sheffield-based progressive musical adventurer, continue their partnership with Vestigium, their fourth album to date, further extending their highly individual exploration of the songform.

Troyka - Ornithophobia
You are as likely to find obscure electronica dance music references in Ornithophobia as you are blues licks, jazzy time signatures and Aphex Twin rhythms. A marvellous genre mash-up!

Nathan Parker Smith Large Ensemble - Not Dark Yet



Heavy metal played by a jazz big band...it works!

The Unthanks - Mount The Air


Northern folk miserablism never sounded so classy...'appen.

Akku Quintet - Molecules
Hypnotic minimalistic jazz groove from Switzerland.

*Bob Dylan - Shadows In The Night


The Zim turns crooner, covering early Sinatra tunes with an effortless panache. To say his singing which has always been, shall we say, idiosyncratic, isn't the best on this album is stating the obvious, but some folk saying he is out of tune are way wide of the mark and they have obviously never had to sit through entire albums' worth of dreadful vocals in the modern progwelt! Have a look at Amazon for a clear divide of opinion. There is a strange naive charm to this record which appeals, in direct contrast to its creator's worldwearily gnarled outlook, and personally I reckon this is marvellous stuff!

*Karda Estra - Strange Relations
An album of extraordinary beauty and depth.

*Sufjan Stevens - Carrie & Lowell
Beautiful and heartbreaking, the story of Stevens' fractured realtionship with his mother. It doesn't get more personal than this.

*Mollmaskin - Heartbreak In ((Stereo))



The prolific Rhys Marsh under his band guise turns out a sumptuous suite of dark and  beguiling folk-prog-Gothic campfire songs for wood trolls.

*Julian Julien - Terre II
Samples on website
European arthouse jazz exotica. Nice!

Schnellertollermeier - X



A marvellously uncompromising racket, and all the better for it, too!

King Crimson - Live at The Orpheum
They might be playing old songs on this teaser from the current three drummer line-up's world tour, but unlike most other bands from the original era who are still functioning, King Crimson continue to reinvent their sound and never stand still. Phenomenal!

Steven Wilson - Hand.Cannot.Erase.



I've had a strange relationship with this, the fourth solo album from the Hardest Working Man In Showbiz. My initial thoughts expresssed in the review were lukewarm, and since then it has grown on me to the point where sometimes I consider it to be the dog's testicles. I say "sometimes", for the other side of the coin is that occasionally I also find it too slick by half and as cold as a fish. However, it is worth the price of admission for the pairing of Home Invasion/Regret #9, which I will now gladly concede are probably THE best 11 minutes of"rock" this year.

Van der Graaf Generator - Merlin Atmos
Fantastic document of the last tour, Plague getting a live premiere. Classy, even though they do unquestionably miss Jaxon. With Crim, the only original prog band who still cut the mustard.

*Bill Fay - Who Is The Sender?
Thirteen songs of wonderment from reinvigorated early 70s cult songwriter

*Jack O'The Clock - Outsider Songs



A quietly strange album of covers from this fine and quirky band.

Trey Gunn - The Waters, They Are Rising



The master of touch guitar with a beautifully crafted ambient album themed around improvisations previously used as intros to the song "Here Comes The Flood".

Ciccada - The Finest of Miracles
Along with Anekdoten, the "proggiest" thing here, and there's nowt wrong with that!

O.R.k. - Inflamed Rides
Heavy and dangerous, like an anvil tumbling down a flight of stairs.

Metallic Taste Of Blood - Doctoring The Dead
MBV meet System Of A Down and whack each other senseless.

*Alco Frisbass - Alco Frisbass
Charming modern Canterbury sounds, from Italy, natch...

Soft Machine - Switzerland 1974



Live document of my favourite Softs line up. Holdsworth is on fire!

*Gavin Harrison - Cheating The Polygraph



Porcupine Tree songs done in a jazz big band style! This works, too :)

*Anekdoten - Until The Ghosts Are Gone
Triumphal return for the Swedish retro-prog masters who now simply sound like Anekdoten. A masterful album. Do I make another plea for that elusive gig in the UK? Oh...I just did. :)

*The Tea Club - Grappling
Consummate modern eclectic prog from a band who keep getting better. Read Raff's review for an insightful analysis of their fine old racket!

Tim Bowness - Stupid Things That Mean The World
Another winner from the champion of doomed romance.

Gizmo - Marlowe's Children Part One
Fine storytelling from sadly obscure Canterbury band. Scribbles in the pipeline...

The Nerve Institute - Fictions
Marvellously intricate derring-do from the one man band and cultural polymath Mike Judge. If this is a "bedroom album", then this is the benchmark to aspire to.

Tom Slatter - Fit The Fourth



Variously described as "steampunk prog" and "barking mad", another one-man band that shows how it's done.

Not A Good Sign - From A Distance
Maybe not quite up to the exacting standards set by their debut album, but nonetheless a classy work of accessible and interesting modern progressive rock.

Taylor's Universe - From Scratch



If you thought there was nothing new to be done with fusion, think again.

Ghost Rhythms - Madeleine
...much the same could be said of this fine album, too. French, and brimful of je ne sais quoi.

KoMaRa - KoMaRa
Deathly, atramentous, and disturbing. Yowzah!

*Guapo - Obscure Knowledge
The heaviest thing in the universe. Listening to and watching this at nerve-wrecking volume live was akin to a religious experience. Possibly my album of the year...possibly.

David Cross & Robert Fripp - Starless Starlight
Elegiac and shimmering, this is probably the most perfect ambient album of 2015. A thing of rare beauty.

*William D Drake - Revere Reach
Oddness that could only be English. Jez explains in his erudite review.

Theo Travis' Double Talk - Transgression
Fantastic tuneage from the King of Reeds!

*Jim O'Rourke - Simple Songs



They're not, at all. The 21st century answer to Todd Rundgren records an album in typically obtuse fashion. It has a huge but odd dynamic range, with lots of bottom and top end, but hardly any middle. It actually sounds great, contrary to some cloth-eared opinionating on Amazon. The songs are wonderful, by the way.

*Echolyn - I Heard You Listening
This is prog, and I like it. There's a surprise for you... :)

King Crimson - 2015 Tour Box
This is progressive music, and I like it. That is no surprise, at all.

Jumble Hole Clough - A List Of Things That Never Happened



The Hebden Bridge Massive continue to cut rugs in their inimitable style. Sparse funk zips though the cosmos with Talking Heads piloting a ship crewed by Smokin' Venusian Dancing Chimps. Educational too...I never knew beforehand that "bathysiderodromophobia" is a fear of subways!

Louis De Mieulle - stars, plants & bugs



Another nice twist on fusion from another Frenchman...it must be something in the water.

*Rêve Général - Howl
Chamber rock to a surreal and dreamlike narrative.

*Loomings - Everyday Mythology
Spellbinding and complex, fun and full of unexpected twists and turns. This and Rêve Général currently in process as far as scribbling goes...

*Sonar - Black Light



Hypnotic math-rock...If Guapo is the rebellious and noisy son, then Sonar is the studied calmness of the father “tut-tutting” in the corner, with a hint of pride.

Thieves' Kitchen - The Clockwork Universe



Absorbing and clever modern prog that doesn't fall back on obvious tropes...well, it wouldn't be here if it did, would it?

Unit Wail - Beyond Space Edges
Where spacerock meets avant rock at the bar, gets drunk and falls over, arhythmically.

*Ángel Ontalva - Tierra Quemada



Anyone familiar with Ángel's work with October Equus or as a solo artist will know what to expect. A bit of a treat...listen to the link!

Necromonkey - Show Me Where It Hertz



Driving Krautrock-inspired synthrock is a description that only scratches the surface. Marvellous album!

...

Well, that's your lot. There are some albums I have in the "to do" pile still in their shrinkwraps, and if they pass muster I will endeavour to include them in the "Ones That Got Away" section next year.

Here are some other bits and bobs...

Best archival release - Van der Graaf Generator - After The Flood - Van der Graaf Generator At The BBC 1968-1977

One That Got Away - Bent Knee - Shiny Eyed Babies
Released in November 2014 and completely missed by me last year, this album is so good I cannot allow it to pass unmentioned.  This great band have now found an appropriately eclectic home at Cuneiform Records, the future looks bright!

Another One That (Almost) Got Away - Peter Hammill - ...all that might have been
Released at the fag end of 2014, it just crept in to my list of that year, but some scribes are including it in their 2015 lists. Hammill's most perfectly executed long song format since Gog/Magog is well worth another mention here.

Gig of the Year - Magma, Cadogan Halls, London, 8th May 2015

Somehow, I find time to read books. Although this weighty tome came out in 2014, as it was an Xmas present I only got round to reading it this year, so a mention for Future Days - Krautrock And The Building Of Modern Germany, by David Stubbs. If you enjoyed Julian Cope's pocket guidebook Krautrocksampler to this fascinating cultural backwater and want to know more, this is the book for you. Incredibly well researched, this book not only has sections on all the major players, but puts it all into a social and historical context. A great read!

Finally, things I do not understand...

Snarky Puppy...incredible musicians playing jazz-fusion? I should love it, lots of folk do. Nope, it passes me by I'm afraid.

Star Wars...shut up, already...

...

That's it for another year, folks. Thanks for reading, have a fab Festive Season, and we'll meet up on the other side. Cheers! :)

Best of Years Gone By...
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010

Monday, 30 November 2015

The MOJO CD - 2015



1. Courtney Barnett - Pedestrian At Best 
First up, someone I've never heard of, old fart that I am. Ms Barnett chanels Elastica chaneling Wire. Enjoyable enough, with lots of punky pizzazz, unremarkable but for Courtney's declamatory vocals.

2. Sleater-Kinney - Bury Our Friends
So, this is what Sleater-Kinney sound like. From The Libertines school but less messy, just. Gets by on pure charm.

3. New Order - Restless
Like Sleater-Kinney, another band with a comeback album out this year. New Order had their moments for me, but quickly became formulaic. They now have a replacement doing a wan impersonation of Hooky, and it sounds like it always sounded like. All rather predicatable.

4. Songhoy Blues - Soubour
A great band from Mali, a place that seems to be the current centre for interesting African music. A beguiling mix of African blues, rock'n'roll and punky energy. Championed by Damon Albarn, the Blur frontman knows a good thing when he hears it, obviously.



5. Gaz Coombes - 20/20
Some really nice modern pop from the Supergrass frontman taken from his highly acclaimed  Matador album. If I was not up to my eyes in reviews to do, I might have bought this.

6. Bill Ryder-Jones - Two To Birkenhead
This could easily have come out in 1978, a mix of Nikki Sudden & The Jacobites louche indie rock meets Neil Young moves, and Wreckless Eric's failed romantic bittersweet swagger. It seems prog is not the only genre to be stuck on past glories.

7. Jim O'Rourke - Last Year
From the musical polymath's marvellous Simple Songs album, the only release on this compilation I already own. It's not simple, at all, but it certainly is a song, and a bloody good one too.

8. John Grant - Down Here
I quite like this guy, he writes some good songs, mostly bitching about broken relationships. If you get too close to him and it goes wrong, he'll almost certainly tear you apart in song. Here, he sounds like late 70s Bowie, and there are worse things to ape.



9. Matthew E. White - Rock & Roll Is Cold
Very Velvets/Lou Reed. There is nothing new under the sun. Apparently it's meant to be knowing, which kills it for me, but probably an unfair way to judge the previously unheard.

10. Sufjan Stevens - Should Have Known Better
I have a couple of albums by this highly individual and remarkable talent. Classy modern folk-pop Americana...sort of. Very nice indeed, and the best track so far on this rather average compilation.

11. Father John Misty - Bored In The USA
The wonderfully acerbic Father John Misty (aka Josh Tillman, ex of Fleet Foxes) here takes on American consumerism and religion. Is there actually a difference, one wonders? A sad Nick Drake-meets-Randy Newman ballad in melancholic reply to Springsteen's tub-thumping similarly titled anthem, countered by biting lyrics..."Save me, President Jesus, I'm bored in the USA". Marvellous! I might have to buy this album.



12. Low - What Part Of Me
This band have been around for a long time. Over twenty years in fact, and are now up to their eleventh album. And I know nothing about them. This is a short, classy, effortless and oddly upbeat yet slighly miserablist anthem, which if I guess right is what they're known for. Can't say it makes want to delve deeper.

13. Julia Holter - Feel You
The album this is lifted from is MOJO's choice for Album Of The Year. This is pleasant enough, a piece of lightly orchestrated intelligent pop. One track out of context is not enough to go on, but it sounds promising.


14. Joanna Newsome - Leaving The City
Joanna Newsome's elfin warblings invite inevitable comparisons to a young Ms Bush, and so does the structure of this song. I saw Joanna live a few years ago at a festival where her lone presence on stage was dwarfed by her harp as she struggled to make an impression on the huddled masses in the field in front of her, later made all the more difficult by a persistent rain shower, when I and many others drifted back to our tents. Judging by this intimate slice of cleverly instrumented escapism, I may have to investigate further.

15. Jason Isbell - If It Takes A Lifetime
"We have both types of music here, country AND western". Jason does country rock. Not for me.

As ever, a mixed bag, and you can check out MOJO's full list HERE. Obviously, some truly innovative releases have been left out completely, but this mag, jointly with Uncut are the two best mainstream music monthlies (extra helping of aliteration, there!) by a country or indeed, urban mile.